Home > Make Rain Barrels > Rain Barrel How To

Rain Barrel How To

October 12th, 2009

 

How To Build Your Own Rainwater Barrel And Save Money!

When the summer months hit, an average homeowner might use over a thousand gallons of water just on his lawn and garden. Using all of this water is expensive and wasteful. A rain barrel harnesses the water that runs off the roof in a storm, saving money and the environment. While it is certainly possible to purchase a rain barrel or a rain barrel kit, building a rain barrel is relatively simple and inexpensive. This article will give you the rain barrel how to information you need to start building a rain barrel with just a few inexpensive materials.

First, gather the parts necessary to make a rain water barrel: one 55 gallon food quality drum, screening, pvc pipe, a spigot, plumber’s tape, and waterproof sealant. If the drum is a used one, be sure to clean it out before using.

Drill a hole in the top of the drum big enough to insert the pipe. Also drill a hole approximately 3/4" near the top for overflow.

Insert the piping into the top hole to check fit, then remove it and wrap with the plumbers tape to prevent leakage. Cover the top of the pipe with screen to keep out debris and mosquitoes.

Near the base of the barrel, drill another hole to accommodate the spigot. Wrap spigot in plumbers tape, secure and seal. A hose may be attached to the spigot so that the water can be directed straight to the garden, if desired.

Finally, use a saw to remove the drain pipe and replace with pvc pipe so that the water drains directly into the barrel. Place the barrel on a level surface, preferably raised to allow better flow of water out of the drum.

The amount of water that can come off a roof during a storm is considerable. That is why when planning the rainwater barrel and how to build it, overflow must be considered. One solution is to construct a second rain collection barrel to be connected to the first. All it requires is some extra pvc pipe to go from one overflow to the next. Add a second overflow hole to the second barrel.

In an area with a lot of rainfall, consider using these rain barrel how to tips to set up a system of up to four barrels. By building rain barrels, a homeowner can see a significant savings on the water bill each summer.

 

Make Your Own Rain Water Barrels

 

 

Rainbarrel Systems Discussions

Kentucky Preppers Network: How to Build A Rain Barrel System

If you already garden or plan to garden you should also be planning to put in a rain barrel system. Rain barrels catch the rain water and gives you free water to water your garden.

Tips on How to Harvest Rainwater

Pay close attention to how your rain gutters are set up. If you have more than one downspout, you may want to position a rain barrel under each downspout to harvest as much rainwater as possible.

Rain Barrel Workshop

Learn how to make a rain barrel out of a plastic food-grade 55 gallon barrel, how to catch rain from your rooftop via your rain gutter downspouts, and how to direct overflow away from buildings.

Wood Rain Barrel

Most rain barrels that are available these days are plastic. This Wood Rain Barrel is much more environmentally friendly than a plastic rain barrel, as well as more attractive. It is made from FSC Certified spruce wood.

Home Made Rain Barrel System

A video showing how to create your own home made and very inexpensive rain barrel sytem.

 Mail this postStumbleUpon It!

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Make Rain Barrels , , , , , , , , , ,

  1. rik2u
    October 15th, 2009 at 22:48 | #1

    We’ve been rainwater harvesting for over 20 years and love the money we save on our water bills. We clean everything from deck furniture, cars, truck, boats, windows, decking, water the victory garden, flowers, hanging baskets, water our pets, and clean up driveways and patios as well. We keep our gutters clean all year long, about every 2-4 weeks, as we have huge oak & pine trees around our home. The leaves, pine needles, sand, mosquitoes during season, creepy crawlies, and bird nests seem to love our rain gutters. But we know our rainwater going into our barrels will be as clean as the rainwater flowing out of our rain gutters. We clean our gutters with a tool called the Gutter Clutter Buster that was purchased on-line. It simply attaches to our 2-1/2″ wet/dry vac hose and literally vacuums out all debris, wet or dry, while I stay on the ground. No ladders needed anymore. When I’m done I empty the vac canister into our compost pile or around my plants for a thicker layer of mulch saving us even more money and wate.
    So Happy Harvesting To All and Keep Those Rain Barrels Coming.

  1. No trackbacks yet.