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Collapsible Rain Barrel – Affordable And Convenient!

February 2nd, 2010

 

Rain barrels are a great way to show your concern for the environment, while also taking good care of your garden and yard plants. A Collapsible Rain Barrel is a great option for seasonal water usage, allowing you to collect and store up to 156 gallons of rainwater easily and conveniently, yet folding away for simple, space saving storage during months of non-use.

Rainwater barrels have become very popular, and very effective, methods of taking care of the plants in your yard. They come in a variety of sizes from a 25 gallon model and up. Such a barrel collects rainwater from your roof, keeping it away from the foundation of your home, and storing it for use later when you need it for garden plants, flowers or other foliage.

Take A Look At These 2 Deals On  The 156 Gallon Barrel  And  The 60 Gallon Barrel 

156 Gallon Collapsable Rainwater Barrel   60 Gallon Collapsable Rainwater Barrel

 

Or Click Here To Check Out More Styles  

 

The Collapsible Rain Water Barrel offers the further advantage of being compact and light weight. This reduces shipping costs at initial purchase, saving you money and lessening the barrel’s carbon footprint. The collapsing feature also makes it easy to store your barrel away during seasons of non-use, easily hanging on the wall of your garden shed, or sitting lightly on a shelf.

A collapsable rain barrel is sturdy, attractive and easy to install. You simply place it underneath your existing diverter or gutter down spout, and the rainwater pours in! Adding a bit of organic mosquito treatment or vinegar to your rainwater barrel will keep the water free of unwanted pests, and placing an old nylon stocking over the downspout will keep the barrel free of leaves and other debris.

When you need to access that rainwater, gravity does the work, sending water out the nozzle and through the house, providing plenty of liquid refreshment to your thirsty garden plants and flowers. When the watering season ends, simply drain the remaining water, allow the barrel to air dry, then collapse it down simply, and store in just inches of space until gardening season begins again. You can also use your barrel year around, as it is durable, attractive and maintenance free!

Rain barrels are a great way of doing your share to help the environment, while also saving money on water for your plants. A collapsible rain barrel is an easy to install option with low initial shipping costs, easy use and simple, space saving storage!

 

A Pop Up Rain Barrel

 

Additional Pop-up Rain Barrel Info

Rain Barrel Project

This Instructable will be an overview of how to setup your own rain barrels. This probably would work for people who want them to be more portable. When I did mine I meant it to be a static system that could be housed in a garage, outside, or basement. I guess the thought of making sure they’re always primed and working properly is a bit more maintenance that I was trying to avoid.

A Guide To Portable Rain Barrels

Rain barrels come in different forms such as portable rain barrel, the rain catcher rain barrel, flat back rain barrel, wood grain rain barrel, flora rain barrel, etc. Portable rain barrels serve multiple purposes.

Decorative Rain Barrels

Since the rain barrels main priority is to hold rainwater, rain barrels are not made out of metal; this is Rain Barrels because they are intended to be portable – brick, concrete, and stone are not good choices.

Save Money and Natural Resources with a Rain Barrel

And there are a few that are simple pop up barrels that can be stored flat when not in use but hold a good volume of water.

These Collapsible Rain Barrels Look Sensible

These collapsible rain barrels look sensible. Pop Up Rain Barrel. Made of flexible, puncture-resistant laminated polyester, this ingenious rain barrel holds up to 45 gallons of water. The wide top zips open for easy dipping. 

 

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Rain Barrel Diverter

September 25th, 2009

 

Rain Barrel Diverter: Use And Installation

With 60 percent of our water consumption going to residential irrigation, and with the problem of runoff reducing ground saturation along with the fact that it can contribute to polluting existing water sources, we really should consider using rain barrels. By diverting your runoff to a barrel you will be helping to protect the environment and aiding in the prevention of future water shortages.

Here are some of the best choices when it comes to a Rain Barrel Diverter:


Pages 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | more

The fact of the matter is that it will rain sometime and rain is a free resource. With the rainwater from a rain barrel you can wash your car, soak your garden or even top off your pool. With three rain barrels that are linked together you can save up to 240 gallons of rainwater and it is possible to fill one with only a 1/4" of rainfall. You should be able to look around and find some that are made of recycled material and save even more of our precious resources.

Your barrel should be between 40 and 80 gallons and made out of a material such as plastic for easy cleaning that will last forever. The lid should screw on, act as a tray and have several small holes in it, as this will stop debris from entering your barrel. You do not want to have a breeding ground for mosquitoes so don’t consider the ones with larger holes and screens as it will just create more work and is less sanitary. Your barrel should have a spigot to hook your hose to and a rain barrel diverter giving you the ability to control where the rainwater goes.

The rain barrel diverter should be placed below your gutter, in front of your downspout and above the barrel to allow for overflow to run out the waste channel to prevent pooling of rain around your barrel should it be full when it rains and is very important to have on your rain collection system. You will find as many diverters as you will find rain collection systems, such as automatic and collapsible, and are certain to find the system to fit your style as they are made in many shapes and colors as to accent your home and be a decorative addition to your flower bed. You can make your own diverter and can find many how to suggestions online if you are wanting to save a few dollars on your system.

 

Rain Barrel Gutter Downspout Diverter

 

 

Rain Overflow Diverters

Gardening The Enviorenment Friendly Way: Rain Barrel Diverter

Attach a rain water diverter to your downspout. Rain barrel diverter kits are inexpensive and alleviate the problem of water pooling at the base of your container.

Collecting Water, Uses of Rain Barrel Diverter

Rain barrel diverters provide the option of saving water. The water which falls from roof tops can be collected in rain barrels. Rain water collection is the best means to save water.

Rain Barrel Diverters – Collecting Rain Water

Rain barrel diverters are one of the easiest ways you can save money around your household. Many cities are facing drought conditions or water restrictions. Because of this, water rates have been rising.

Rainwater Diverter Kit

The Saving Rain Diverter Box is a water conservation and runoff management system with several options. Divert the maximum amount of rainwater from your roof into one or more rain barrels.

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Rainbarrels For Conserving Water

February 23rd, 2009

 

Rainbarrels are a great way to conserve water around the home and garden and this article discusses different ways you can save water including rain harvesting.

Tips and information on saving water at home and in the garden.

As the warmer months approach, now is a good time to start thinking about how you can save water over the summer months and beyond. We often think of the water in our taps as a never ending supply, but in fact it is very important to conserve water, as only a very small amount of the earth’s water is fresh, about 3%. And when you consider that almost 70% of that is frozen, there is not much left for human consumption. The threat of global warming and the issues of lower rainfall that may bring to some areas, also means that we need to start thinking now about how we can reduce our water consumption.

There are actually many simple ways to save water around the home, reducing your dependence on mains water and therefore also saving you money. Some everyday tips include only using the water required in pans and kettles, not running the tap whilst brushing your teeth, showering rather than bathing and making sure that washing machines and dishwashers are only used when full. None of these cost anything to implement, but some additional very inexpensive water saving devices can help further. Install a Hippo in your toilet cistern to reduce the amount of water used to flush, and invest in a water butt for your garden to collect rainwater. This can then be used to water the garden or wash the car. Whilst not reducing your overall water consumption, you are lowering your dependence on mains water where drinking-quality water is not necessary. 
rain barrel with spigot

More expensive options are full rainwater harvesting and greywater recycling systems. Rainwater can be used for household tasks such as toilet flushing and in washing machines, whilst greywater (water previously used in handbasins, showers and baths) can be processed to be reused in toilets and washing machines. These systems are more of an investment but can significantly reduce your dependence on mains water.

<< SIDENOTE: Rainbarrels can be very cost-effective and rather inexpensive for collecting rain water. >>

The summer months in particular can see an increase in water consumption due to the needs of a garden. As well as using rainwater as much as possible, you can reduce the amount of water needed with a few simple measures. Water plants in the early morning or evening to reduce evaporation and use a watering can rather than hose or sprinkler. Don’t worry about watering your lawn as grass is very hardy and will soon recover even if it turns brown during a hot spell.

All of these water saving tips can really help to reduce your water consumption. Try to think carefully about any water you use and you will soon see a difference in your water bill.

UK Energy Saving
UK Energy Saving Home Page

By Hayley Jones
Published: 5/27/2008  

 

Rainbarrels Around The Home

Also known as water butts in the UK and rainwater tanks in many parts of the United States, rain barrels are water containers wherein rain water from rooftops is collected and stored.

Protecting the Environment with a Rain Barrel

Collecting falling water in a barrel or container is not a revolutionary new idea. The concept of a rain barrel and other types of rain catchers has been in use as long as agriculture… pretty much as long as civilization.

Installing Rainbarrels, Rain Chains, And Underground Cisterns

In January’s Sunset Magazine there was a short article about installing rain chains, rain barrels and cisterns in order to collect rain water, and I was really interested in it because I was planning on doing at least 2 of them.

Rain Barrels And Gardens

Saving money and the environment often go hand-in-hand, a match made on Earth.

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How To Make A Rain Barrel

February 15th, 2009

 

Collecting water in a rain barrel is certainly not a new idea. People have collected rainwater and used it to water gardens and irrigate crops almost since the beginning of time. Over the course of the last few decades, however, most people have chosen to rely solely on their municipal water systems, without considering the cost or the ecological impact.

Storing rainwater in rain barrels lowers water bills and reduces storm water runoff. Storm water runoff carries pesticides, grease, oil, and other toxins into our waterways and contributes to erosion, eating away valuable land. Using a rain barrel is one conservation measure that is being encouraged by many municipalities and environmentalists. Is it right for you?

wine barrel rain barrel

What You Need to Know about Rain Barrels

When you make the decision to begin using a rain barrel, you’ll station it at one of the downspouts of your home or business. When the rain falls on your roof and runs into your gutters, a downspout diverter directs the rain through a screen and into the barrel. You then have a source of natural, chemical free water to use when caring for your plants.

Whether you opt to build your own rain barrel or decide to purchase one, there are certain things you need to keep in mind. It is important that your rain barrel be child safe and mosquito proof. Your rain barrel should have a full screen and a lid that you can fasten securely.

In order to prevent algae, a rain barrel should be made of a dark material that does not allow the penetration of sunlight. Be certain that the material is non-toxic. If you’re making your own rain barrel, make sure that you know the history of the barrel.

The best rain barrels will feature a metal spout near the bottom of the barrel so it is easy to access the collected water. Make sure you place the rain barrel on a level surface and secure it to prevent tipping.

A well-designed rain barrel will also have an overflow system that comes into play when the barrel is full. Point the overflow away from the foundation of the house to prevent water damage.

Water that has been collected in rain barrels is not meant for consumption by humans or animals. Your landscaping, gardens and houseplants, however, will thrive when you use this natural, untreated water to care for them.

A Barrel Full of Benefits

Using a rain barrel is a simple way to help conserve water and protect our rivers and streams. Even if you purchase your rain barrel, it will soon pay for itself by lowering your water bill. The fact that you’re taking one more step towards an eco-friendly lifestyle is priceless. Remember, it’s a series of little steps that helps us make giant strides towards protecting our planet.

By: Richard H.

Article Directory: http://www.articledashboard.com

Composters.com is an internet retailer of environmentally-friendly compost bins, compost tumblers, rain barrels, lawn sweeper, and other composting and gardening accessories.

Making Your Own Rain Barrel  Project

Why spend upwards of $100 on a rain barrel when you can easily make one yourself for less than $20? This is an easy DIY project that can be done in hours.

How To Make A Rain Barrel Guide

I love my rain barrels. I have 4 barrels setup around the house. After many changes, I settled on this rain barrel design.

How To Build A Rain Water Collector

In this instructable, I will show how I made a rainwater collection system to water my garden. This helps to conserve water and make good use of a free and renewable resource.

Harvest Rain Water By Using A Rain Barrel

All you need is a plastic tank, garden hose and a platform and you are ready to setup your own home built rain barrel.

Make Rainwater Harvesting Easy

Laura Allen explains how to build your own rain barrel system and demonstrates how to create your own water catchment system utilizing several recycled maraschino cherry containers.

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