Archive

Posts Tagged ‘plastic’

Make Your Own Rain Barrel

May 26th, 2009

 

how to build a rain barrelMake your own rain barrel following the instructions discussed in this article. This is one of the most detailed plans to make your own rain barrel that you are likely to come across.

To conserve the municipal water used on our flowers, shrubs, and tomato plants, we installed an easy-to-manipulate 150-gallon plastic farm-type stock-watering tank underneath our back deck where it became a hidden rain barrel. We drew the spout-collected rain water from the tank with a small portable electric sump-pump having a garden hose attached to its outlet. During the manual watering of our plants, we controlled the flow with an adjustable nozzle at the outer end of the hose.

Items used

  1. one 150-gallon plastic stock-watering tank with a drain plug, 35"H x 39"W x 58"L (acquired from a discount farm-supply hardware store)
  2. one portable 110-VAC submersible sump-pump, flat-bottom floor-type with hose attachment, 1/4-to-1/3-hp, or equivalent
  3. four inexpensive wooden slats, 1" x 2" x 40"
  4. one roll of fine-mesh aluminum window screen, 64"x44" or larger
  5. eight 1"-long speed screws and a compatible screwdriver
  6. small box of 1/4" staples and small hammer, or equivalents
  7. one garden hose 5/8" by 50′, or as needed with adjustable nozzle
  8. one electrical extension cord (length needed to reach an outlet)
  9. one 110-VAC outdoor electrical outlet (switch-controlled if possible)
  10. one rain-gutter spout from the house rooftop

Assembly

  1. Attach the wooden slats across the top narrow width of the tank by screwing them down to the rim.
  2. Place the sump-pump with attached hose on the floor of the tank at the desired location. Let its electrical cord and attached garden hose hang out over the rim.
  3. Spread the screen over the slats atop the tank to cover it entirely. Staple the screen down to the slats. Let the screen portion above the pump and its cord and hose remain as a loose flap in case the pump must be serviced or removed.
  4. Tighten the drain plug.
  5. Place the tank close to the chosen gutter spout. If possible, hide it behind or under a deck or bush, or camouflage it as desired.
  6. Route the end of the gutter spout to the top of the tank above the screen so that the tank will collect the rain water.
  7. Extend the extension cord to the power supply.

Water collection

The experts say a one-inch rain will yield a total of 600-gallons of water from a 1000-square-foot home catchment area. Our home is slightly over 1000-square-feet. Thus, our tank filled to overflow from one spout during the first rain. The overflow drained away from the house via a sloped terrace.

We had no trouble drawing water from the tank all summer since we had adequate rainfall this year. A larger tank would have filled just as easily. The tank’s fine-screen covering kept it and its collected water free of excess debris, which consisted of wind-blown grass, leaves, and miscellaneous material coming from the screen-covered roof gutters.

Two advantages

Two major advantages came with harvesting rooftop water in this manner. First, the tank was not an eyesore because it was hidden. Our deck is surrounded with shrubs.

Second, the sump-pump provided adequate water pressure at all times, even when the water level in the tank got low. In fact, with our tank-and-pump arrangement, we could have run multiple sprinklers for the lawn, too. We might try that next summer although it might require a slightly different pump.

Author: J Delms

Further information. Rain Barrel Guide, How to Use Rain Barrels for Water Collection http://www.rainbarrelguide.com Author contact: j__l__d@sbcglobal.net

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=J_Delms

 Mail this post

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Make Rain Barrels , , , , , , , , ,

Rain Barrel Garden

May 24th, 2009

 

half rain barrelIf you are a gardener you probably already do a bit composting to recycle yard and kitchen waste. This homemade "Black Gold" does wonders for your plants and soil. But, have you discovered the gardening benefits of harvesting and recycling rainwater to use in the garden?

Many communities nationwide are experiencing either short-term or long-term water shortages. Some communities have begun rationing programs and impose fines if a homeowner uses too much water. Why not try some simple rainwater harvesting techniques and use the water to irrigate your garden? You’ll be able to water your plants when they need it and you may see a bit of savings on your water bill at the same time.

Harvesting rainwater is as simple as placing a rain barrel under a roof gutter downspout. Practically any large, clean container can be used as a rain barrel. For instance, you can use a plastic or metal trash can. However, there are major benefits to using commercially designed rain barrels.

Features of commercially available rain barrels include: childproof and pet-proof lids, mosquito screens, overflow hardware, spigots for attaching hoses, and the ability to link multiple barrels together. These features make using your rainwater much easier and safer. Many city water departments will give homeowners a rebate on their water bill if they buy a rain barrel.

You can find durable, heavy-duty rainbarrels at most home improvement stores and garden centers. You can also order them from online suppliers. These rain barrels can be quite attractive also. Some are made to look like traditional round wooden barrels while some are square, or half-round to provide versatility and style when placing one beside your house. Some rain barrels currently on the market are made from recycled shipping containers for Mediterranean foods such as olives.

What are some of the advantages of collecting rainwater for use in your garden? For starters, you will be doing your part to conserve both water and energy. When you use rainwater you will not be using your municipal drinking water and will not be using the energy it takes to pump it to your house. It’s free, so you won’t be billed for it! Rainwater is fresh and naturally low in salt and chlorine so it’s good for your plants. Most of the time it is not cold and won’t shock your plants like water from an underground source can do.

Your grandparents probably used rain barrels to irrigate their gardens. Why not try something old to solve a new problem and conserve water by using a rain barrel? Even if you live in an area with very little annual rainfall you will be amazed when your rain barrel fills up after just one or two rain showers.

Author: Amy Passmore

Article by Amy Passmore for The Gardening Guide. Visit The Gardening Guide for more information on conserving water in your garden

This article may be freely distributed as long as the author’s name and live website link appear

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Amy_Passmore

Rain Barrels Save Money

Rain barrels provide a way to supply water to your garden or wash a vehicle, and never turn on the spigot in the home. You will save money on your water bill. You are also helping the environment when you use rain barrels.

My Garden Can Keep Me Cool During The Summer??

Our first Green Cottage homeowner will have her very own rain garden in her yard. Not only will the trees she will plant help keep her house cool, but by using a rain barrel to divert storm water into the garden.

Rain Barrel Reviews 

I have a large vegetable garden that requires alot of water during growing season. I have always used a timer to try and cut back on the use of water, but using this Rain Barrel has helped me decrease that use even more.

Tattoos and Rain Barrels

The next two pictures are my rain barrel and the overflow containers I use to save water. I can water my garden and container plants for about ten days. I also fill my water garden with rainwater.

Why You Need To Buy A Quality Rain Barrel?

Rain barrels can help hold gallons of rainwater, which can be used later. You can therefore save a lot of money in water bills and can offer fresh water supply to the plants in your garden.

Rain Barrel : Start Collecting Free Water

Rain Barrel : Start collecting free water. Rarely does Mother Nature provide your lawn or garden with just enough rain to keep if fat and happy throughout the Summer. 

 Mail this post

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Rain Barrels , , , , , , , ,

Making Rain Barrels

May 23rd, 2009

 

rain barrel setupMaking rain barrels is a great way to join the recycling craze. Not only does making rain barrels recycle rain water it also recycles used plastic barrels. This article takes a look at how you can use rainbarrels to reuse rainwater.

Most of us take water for granted until it doesn’t rain for a month or two and the city asks you to stop watering your lawn and garden. One of the best ways to help guard against this is by recycling rainwater. There are many ways to collect and recycle rainwater but one of the best and most cost effective is to setup a simple rain barrel.

It is estimated that an inexpensive rain barrel can save you as much as 1000 gallons of water over the course of a normal summer by simply recycling rainwater.

Of course, the exact amount will vary depending on the amount of rainfall in your area but the savings from recycling rainwater in most cases will be substantial. The idea is to position the rain barrel under a roof drain downspout so that it collects rain running off the roof of your house and recycling the rainwater on your plants and lawn as needed. You can buy a ready-made rain barrel but it is also very easy and inexpensive to build your own.

Almost all the materials are available at your local hardware store. The main item you will need is a large plastic drum. Getting one is not as difficult as it may seem. Most soft drink manufacturers around the world are willing to sell you an inexpensive 55 gallon plastic drum. Usually the plastic drum you get will have its top sealed so you will have to drill a hole in the middle top of the drum. Many people will put a screen or other type of filter over this hole so that leaves and other debris do not get into the rain barrel. If your roof gutter system already has grills or screens to keep leaves out then you won’t need to worry about a filter for the barrel. Usually it is a good idea to raise the barrel up off the ground by putting it on cinder blocks. This will help protect the ground underneath and make it easier to recycle the rainwater you collect in the rain barrel. You will undoubtedly have to raise the height of your downspout as well so that it is slightly above the level of the top of the drum.

Now that we have the drum setup for collecting rainwater, we need to arrange a way to get it out. The simplest way is to drill a small hole in the lower side of the drum a couple inches up from the bottom and glue in a PVC male adaptor then attach a 3 to 4 foot length of plastic hose to this adaptor. Of course, it is important to keep the end of the hose above the top of the barrel so that the barrel doesn’t drain. You can notch the top rim of the drum as a holder for the hose or alternately you can attach a plastic valve to the end of the hose. Finally, at the end of the hose you will want to attach a plastic adaptor that allows the attachment of a standard garden hose. This setup will use gravity to drain the drum. To use the rainwater collected simply put the end of the garden hose on the ground you intend to water, open the valve if you used one and the drum will self-drain out the end of the garden hose. To stop the flow either close the valve or raise the end of the garden hose above the top level of the drum.

Author: Michael Russell

Michael Russell Your Independent guide to Recycling

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Michael_Russell

Be sure to check out this video about making rain barrels.

 Mail this post

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rain Barrels , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A Plastic Rain Barrel Provides Many Benefits For The Home

March 21st, 2009

 

A plastic rain barrel offers many benefits such as saving water, reducing your water bill and helping the environment. This article reviews some reasons why a plastic rain barrel is a good addition to your home and why you should consider one.

Have you ever looked outside during a particularly strong rain shower and thought about all that water that was going to waste? Even a halfway decent summer shower can produce thousands of gallons of water in an amazingly short period of time. Oftentimes, all that water is simply wasted, which is a shame really when you could be collecting at least a small portion of it with rain barrels.

Rain barrels are particularly handy devices to have around the house especially if you are concerned about reducing your consumption of water from your mains source-as you should be. Not only can they reduce your water bill considerably, they also have a far-reaching effect on your immediate locality and on the environment in general.

If every one of us installed rain barrels around our property, we can greatly reduce the amount of water that seeps into the ground, stripping the top soil of essential nutrients and possibly even leaching pollutants into the water table underneath. Installing rain barrels can also lessen the load on your city’s sewage and water treatment facilities.

<—- Here’s a great little video on how a recycled food barrel can be used as a plastic rain barrel —->

 

With all the benefits that these can bring to the environment, there are more than enough reasons why we should have them around the home. Even without these benefits however, the water that we can collect from them can be useful for our own daily needs. The water that you collect in rain barrels can be used for a wide variety of tasks that do not require potable water, such as watering plants or livestock for instance, and even for washing clothes, cars, driveways, and tools. These are all uses that we do not have to depend on the mains water supply for, and for which rain barrels are particularly useful.

small rain barrels

Rain barrels are not that hard to make either, or-if you choose to buy one-that expensive. In fact, you can make do with any number of commonly available household materials and improvise rain barrels that will do more than an adequate job of collecting water. When making rain barrels out of household materials however, it is important to make sure that you use only food grade plastic. Other types of materials may contain chemicals that can leach into the collected water, thereby restricting their potential use.

The rain barrell can be strategically located in an area of your property where they will be able to collect the most amount of water. Underneath water spouts that connect from your roof are good examples, and this will allow for more efficient water collection.

As a means of reducing your impact on the environment and to help you save on water costs, rain barrels simply cannot be beat!

Author: Al Zan

For more on rain barrels and where to find discounts, visit http://palmettorainbarrels.com/

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Al_Zan

 Mail this post

Technorati Tags: , , , , ,

Rain Water Barrel Types , , , , ,