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Make Your Own Rain Barrel

May 26th, 2009

 

how to build a rain barrelMake your own rain barrel following the instructions discussed in this article. This is one of the most detailed plans to make your own rain barrel that you are likely to come across.

To conserve the municipal water used on our flowers, shrubs, and tomato plants, we installed an easy-to-manipulate 150-gallon plastic farm-type stock-watering tank underneath our back deck where it became a hidden rain barrel. We drew the spout-collected rain water from the tank with a small portable electric sump-pump having a garden hose attached to its outlet. During the manual watering of our plants, we controlled the flow with an adjustable nozzle at the outer end of the hose.

Items used

  1. one 150-gallon plastic stock-watering tank with a drain plug, 35"H x 39"W x 58"L (acquired from a discount farm-supply hardware store)
  2. one portable 110-VAC submersible sump-pump, flat-bottom floor-type with hose attachment, 1/4-to-1/3-hp, or equivalent
  3. four inexpensive wooden slats, 1" x 2" x 40"
  4. one roll of fine-mesh aluminum window screen, 64"x44" or larger
  5. eight 1"-long speed screws and a compatible screwdriver
  6. small box of 1/4" staples and small hammer, or equivalents
  7. one garden hose 5/8" by 50′, or as needed with adjustable nozzle
  8. one electrical extension cord (length needed to reach an outlet)
  9. one 110-VAC outdoor electrical outlet (switch-controlled if possible)
  10. one rain-gutter spout from the house rooftop

Assembly

  1. Attach the wooden slats across the top narrow width of the tank by screwing them down to the rim.
  2. Place the sump-pump with attached hose on the floor of the tank at the desired location. Let its electrical cord and attached garden hose hang out over the rim.
  3. Spread the screen over the slats atop the tank to cover it entirely. Staple the screen down to the slats. Let the screen portion above the pump and its cord and hose remain as a loose flap in case the pump must be serviced or removed.
  4. Tighten the drain plug.
  5. Place the tank close to the chosen gutter spout. If possible, hide it behind or under a deck or bush, or camouflage it as desired.
  6. Route the end of the gutter spout to the top of the tank above the screen so that the tank will collect the rain water.
  7. Extend the extension cord to the power supply.

Water collection

The experts say a one-inch rain will yield a total of 600-gallons of water from a 1000-square-foot home catchment area. Our home is slightly over 1000-square-feet. Thus, our tank filled to overflow from one spout during the first rain. The overflow drained away from the house via a sloped terrace.

We had no trouble drawing water from the tank all summer since we had adequate rainfall this year. A larger tank would have filled just as easily. The tank’s fine-screen covering kept it and its collected water free of excess debris, which consisted of wind-blown grass, leaves, and miscellaneous material coming from the screen-covered roof gutters.

Two advantages

Two major advantages came with harvesting rooftop water in this manner. First, the tank was not an eyesore because it was hidden. Our deck is surrounded with shrubs.

Second, the sump-pump provided adequate water pressure at all times, even when the water level in the tank got low. In fact, with our tank-and-pump arrangement, we could have run multiple sprinklers for the lawn, too. We might try that next summer although it might require a slightly different pump.

Author: J Delms

Further information. Rain Barrel Guide, How to Use Rain Barrels for Water Collection http://www.rainbarrelguide.com Author contact: j__l__d@sbcglobal.net

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=J_Delms

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Buy Rain Barrel

May 1st, 2009

 

Rain Barrel SalesBuy a rain barrel. Not only will it help the environment, but it will also help your wallet. This artilcle discusses some of the reasons why you should want to buy a rain barrel.

There is an immediate need for water conservation because the world’s available supply of fresh water is shrinking; one way to help conserve water is with the installation of a rain barrel.

Right now there are 600 million people in the world who are living with water-scarcity problems. According to Population Action International, by the year 2025 there will be between 2.7 billion and 3.2 billion people who are living in water-scarce or water-stressed conditions. The two main contributors to the water problem are global warming, which turns fertile land into arid deserts, and man-made creations, which alter ground- water run-off patterns.

Each North American consumes an average of 350 liters of water inside the home each day. There are parts of the world that do not have any fresh water yet much of our valuable drinking water is wasted in our yard. We have to remember, however, that treated water does not provide any added benefit for plants. City watering restrictions are usually put into place for these warmer months. Even with restrictions that cities put on water during this time, water usage often increases up to 50% in the warm weather, due to lawn and garden watering.

One of the easiest things you can do to save water while still watering your plants, is to install a rain barrel. A rain barrel hooks up to the downspout of your home to collect and store rain water until it is needed for your lawn and garden. Rain barrels help the environment, help to water your plants, and help to accentuate your backyard decor. For example, Algreen’s rain barrels are very elegantly designed, with smooth clay-like contours, and an elegant planter on its top. Algreen’s rain barrels are made in Canada and are designed to withstand a Canadian winter. They include a lifetime warranty on the enclosure, and the Cascata rain barrel now comes in a Deluxe Model which includes a pump-driven watering system.

Author: Gerry Fung

For more information about Algreen’s line of rain barrels and composters, go to GardenSuperMart.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gerry_Fung

5 Great Rain Barrel Designs

Rain barrels are actually great DIY projects where you can make your own for less than $15. You can also buy some pretty snazzy models.

Buy Rain Barrels and More

So, I have been thinking that it would be good for all of us to work on making our house a bit more green. I would like to buy rain barrels and more. I was thinking that I would start with a rain barrel and maybe a compost bin.

Mother’s Day Eco-Friendly Gift Ideas – Gifts To Help Mom Go Green

What would your mom (or wife) want with a barrel of rain water? There’sa lot of uses for collected rain water that are good for the environment and her water bill.

Watering Plants – Buy a Rain Barrel

One way to ensure that your plants are getting the moisture they need without breaking the bank is to install a rain barrel. Rain barrels harvest free water that’s relatively pure and great for watering garden plants.

Thrifty Green Gardening

Buy a rain barrel – just an inch of rain from part of our roof runoff filled our 55-gallon barrel last week. We’ll use that to water the garden and our freshly planted trees until it runs out (or rains again).

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Wooden Rain Barrels And A Focus On Green Homes

March 21st, 2009

 

Wooden rain barrels can play an integral part in any green home landscaping efforts. This article reviews other important ways to make your landscape more green.

Landscaping a home in green manner is an important part of planning and building your green home. Landscaping consumes a lot of water and maintaining your yard can produce a large amount of carbon monoxide. Green landscaping means selecting plants that reduce the amount of water used to keep them alive.

White Oak Rain BarrelsFor the lawn, plant grass that grows very slowly and requires very little water to survive. By planting this type of grass, your lawn would not need to be mowed every week, but maybe only a few times a summer, reducing the amount of exhaust from your mowing activities. Also since water bills are usually calculated by consumption, the less water the yard requires, the lower the water bill.

For the plants and bushes around the home, select hardy plants. Hardy plants are less susceptible to diseases and damaging pests, allowing you to forego or eliminate pesticides and fertilizers. The less of these chemicals that are used the better it is for the environment, reducing the amount of chemicals that run-off of plants during a rainstorm and soak into the ground. This type of run-off of pesticides and fertilizers has the potential to contaminate ground water and drinking water.

Another major consideration with green landscaping is the heat island effect. The heat island effect is heat from the home, from man-made surfaces around the home, and from the lack of appropriate landscaping. The combined heat from these sources can increase the temperature in a community noticeably. Heat islands can cause increased use of air conditioning, increased air pollution and greenhouse gas production, and lower water quality.

For your green home, this effect can make your heating and cooling systems less effective. The right types of landscaping can help prevent the heat island effect. For example, planting our hardy trees, shrubs and plants at least 24 inches away from the house can break up the heat transfer mechanism. In addition, planting deciduous trees on the west side of your green home or along driveways and walkways can be very effective for cooling the house and yard. Plan ahead, though. Trees and bushes growth over time can interfere with the effectiveness of any solar panels that are installed.

When planning your landscaping, plan to install a rain barrel as well. Why not store some of the run-off rainwater for eco-friendly, free water for watering the lawn, plants, scrubs, and trees? In addition to a rain barrel, the ground can be shaped to direct water coming from the roof and the ground during a rainstorm to collect around the plants, shrubs, and trees in the yard. This allows the earth to do your work for you. As the water from the storm drains into the ground, the last part of the ground to dry out is the part of the lawn that received the most water, reducing the amount of tap water needed.

By taking the extra time to address these issues during the design of your green home, you can achieve a beautiful, very low maintenance and environmental-friendly landscaped yard.

Author: Kimberley Ward

Kim Ward is Marketing Director for Green Earth Energy Homes at http://greenearthenergyhomes.com

Green Earth Energy Homes offer affordable, practical, LEED and Energy Star certified homes. Save thousands on energy costs and qualify for thousands in government tax incentives and benefits. Contact Kim for more information about our green homes or to view our model

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Kimberley_Ward 

Wooden rain barrels are an easy addition to a green home and the benefits will more than pay for themselves very quickly. Why not add a wooden rain barrel to your landscape.

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Rainbarrels For Conserving Water

February 23rd, 2009

 

Rainbarrels are a great way to conserve water around the home and garden and this article discusses different ways you can save water including rain harvesting.

Tips and information on saving water at home and in the garden.

As the warmer months approach, now is a good time to start thinking about how you can save water over the summer months and beyond. We often think of the water in our taps as a never ending supply, but in fact it is very important to conserve water, as only a very small amount of the earth’s water is fresh, about 3%. And when you consider that almost 70% of that is frozen, there is not much left for human consumption. The threat of global warming and the issues of lower rainfall that may bring to some areas, also means that we need to start thinking now about how we can reduce our water consumption.

There are actually many simple ways to save water around the home, reducing your dependence on mains water and therefore also saving you money. Some everyday tips include only using the water required in pans and kettles, not running the tap whilst brushing your teeth, showering rather than bathing and making sure that washing machines and dishwashers are only used when full. None of these cost anything to implement, but some additional very inexpensive water saving devices can help further. Install a Hippo in your toilet cistern to reduce the amount of water used to flush, and invest in a water butt for your garden to collect rainwater. This can then be used to water the garden or wash the car. Whilst not reducing your overall water consumption, you are lowering your dependence on mains water where drinking-quality water is not necessary. 
rain barrel with spigot

More expensive options are full rainwater harvesting and greywater recycling systems. Rainwater can be used for household tasks such as toilet flushing and in washing machines, whilst greywater (water previously used in handbasins, showers and baths) can be processed to be reused in toilets and washing machines. These systems are more of an investment but can significantly reduce your dependence on mains water.

<< SIDENOTE: Rainbarrels can be very cost-effective and rather inexpensive for collecting rain water. >>

The summer months in particular can see an increase in water consumption due to the needs of a garden. As well as using rainwater as much as possible, you can reduce the amount of water needed with a few simple measures. Water plants in the early morning or evening to reduce evaporation and use a watering can rather than hose or sprinkler. Don’t worry about watering your lawn as grass is very hardy and will soon recover even if it turns brown during a hot spell.

All of these water saving tips can really help to reduce your water consumption. Try to think carefully about any water you use and you will soon see a difference in your water bill.

UK Energy Saving
UK Energy Saving Home Page

By Hayley Jones
Published: 5/27/2008  

 

Rainbarrels Around The Home

Also known as water butts in the UK and rainwater tanks in many parts of the United States, rain barrels are water containers wherein rain water from rooftops is collected and stored.

Protecting the Environment with a Rain Barrel

Collecting falling water in a barrel or container is not a revolutionary new idea. The concept of a rain barrel and other types of rain catchers has been in use as long as agriculture… pretty much as long as civilization.

Installing Rainbarrels, Rain Chains, And Underground Cisterns

In January’s Sunset Magazine there was a short article about installing rain chains, rain barrels and cisterns in order to collect rain water, and I was really interested in it because I was planning on doing at least 2 of them.

Rain Barrels And Gardens

Saving money and the environment often go hand-in-hand, a match made on Earth.

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Rainbarrel For Home And Garden

February 11th, 2009

 

Back To Barrels
by: News Canada 7ebbec

 home rain barrels(NC)-Reusing rainwater is not a new concept. Families have saved water in ponds, cisterns, buckets and barrels for centuries for use in watering, washing and even drinking. In fact, this practice is still common in many parts of the world.

Nevertheless, almost 40% of household H2O in Canada is used to water lawns and gardens. This is extraordinarily inefficient. It’s also unnecessary. "Using a rain barrel to catch water flowing from eaves troughs is a simple, cheap and effective way to water our lawns and gardens," Derril Linseman, Product Manager at Home Hardware is quick to point out. In fact, if your town bans watering during the dry season, a rain barrel may be the only way to get your greenery the water it needs.

Rainwater is air-temperature, oxygenated and unchlorinated – all of which make it better for plants than municipal tap water. As an added bonus, rain barrels divert rainwater from our sewers onto porous ground. This means that it gets filtered through layers of soil and rock before it ends up in ground water aquifers, lakes or streams. Without rain barrels, this water goes straight into our sewers, often causing overflows of raw sewage into the natural environment.

Setting up a rain barrel is simple. They’re available at most Home Hardware and Home Building Centre locations for anywhere from $75 for a basic model to $150 for the deluxe variety. High-end barrels come equipped with screen filters, overflow hoses and taps.

Once you’ve got your barrel, simply remove the bottom section of your eaves trough’s downspout and set the barrel underneath. Then attach plastic tubing or flexible piping to the bottom of the spout to direct water straight into your barrel. It’s really that simple. And the benefits are almost immeasurable.

 

About The Author

News Canada provides a wide selection of current, ready-to-use copyright free news stories and ideas for Television, Print, Radio, and the Web.

News Canada is a niche service in public relations, offering access to print, radio, television, and now the Internet media, with ready-to-use, editorial "fill" items. Monitoring and analysis are two more of our primary services. The service supplies access to the national media for marketers in the private, the public, and the not-for-profit sectors. Your corporate and product news, consumer tips and information are packaged in a variety of ready-to-use formats and are made available to every Canadian media organization including weekly and daily newspapers, cable and commercial television stations, radio stations, as well as the Web sites Canadians visit most often. Visit News Canada and learn more about the NC services.

This article was posted on May 10, 2003

How A Rainy Day Can Save You Money

Rain barrels are fairly inexpensive so you shouldn’t have to spend a lot of money on this but if you really want to be frugal about it then you should make your own rainbarrel.

Decorative Rainbarrel

Since water is an ever decreasing precious resource, it only makes sense to look into the many benefits that rain barrels can offer you as well as the environment.

RAIN BARRELS SAVE WATER FOR GARDEN

Rain barrel water collection is an excellent way to save rain water when we have it, and use on our gardens and lawns later. Also, rain water is so much better than faucet water for plants.

RainbBarrel: Gotta Have One 

Gotta have a rain barrel in this drought in Atlanta. What a great way to save water! 

Save On Your Water Consumption With Rain Barrels

Do you know that you can actually harvest rainwater and save them for future use? Yes, you can actually use the rainwater for your garden with the use of rain barrels.

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